Reverb Tanks

Hammond popularized the use of reverberation devices in their church organs in the 1940s.  As natural reverberation negatively affected spoken sermons, early churches were designed to be acoustically dead.  Early Hammond organs were sold to churches on the principle that their artifical reverberation would greatly enhance the organ music. Reverberation was first introduced into guitar amps by Fender around 1961.  They purchased and marketed a stand-alone spring unit from Hammond.  It was first incorporated in a Fender amplifier with the Vibroverb of 1963 and then spread widely throughout the amp line, and has become a standard feature on many different brands of amplifier today.

Typically, the amplifier's audio signal is bled from the main signal path via a reverb driver circuit. This signal is applied to the reverb tank input transducer coil and this in turn moves the transducer magnets. (similar but opposite of a loudspeaker mechanism) These magnets are mechanically coupled to the transmission springs and they transfer the signal across their length, reaching the output transducer at the other end of the reverb tank, where the mechanical movement is again converted back into an electrical signal.  The number of springs, their length and wire / coil size determine the quality and amount of delay across the reverb tank.  The delayed audio signal is then fed to a reverb recovery circuit which amplifies it and feeds it back into the main audio signal path, normally via the reverb control that adjusts the amount of signal returned, and the overall level of reverb experienced.

Please contact us at sales@tonetubes.co.za if you require a reverb tank model not listed here. We can supply all Accutronics / Belton and Mod tank models.

Please note:  Due to reverb tank size and packaging requirements we can only ship these items with Postnet2Postnet (2-4 working days)   Please include your Postnet branch details at checkout

 

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